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    • Stateline Story
    October 9, 2001
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    The cost of an official assessment of Iowas anti-terrorism needs? At least $750,000. The estimated cost per resident of fully equipping Iowas public health system to deal with a terrorist attack using biological or chemical weapons? $3.91. The peace of mind that would come to state residents from knowing that Iowa's health system is ready to help them in a crisis? Priceless. State epidemiologist Dr. Patricia Quinlisk estimated the costs of preparing her state to counter a chemical or biological attack in testimony before a U.S. Senate panel last week. more

    • Stateline Story
    October 1, 2001
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    While federal officials disagree over the readiness of the nation's public health system to respond to a terrorist attack involving biological or chemical weapons, Maryland Health Secretary Georges C. Benjamin, a physician appointed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening two years ago to oversee the state's 10,000 public health employees, says the discussion is no longer theoretical: His department is already working to defend the public. Benjamin, the new president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, says states are in a better position to respond to an act of bioterrorism than they were even three weeks ago, but much more needs to be done. more

    • Stateline Story
    September 24, 2001
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    Days before a hijacked plane slammed into the Pentagon, Virginia emergency medical personnel completed massage training. This turned out to be invaluable in caring for rescue workers with aching muscles from heavy lifting, and has emerged as a lesson learned from the terrorist attacks, Virginia Health Commissioner Anne Peterson said. more

    • Stateline Story
    September 11, 2001
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    President George W. Bush is in the process of drafting an executive order on federalism that might help defuse criticism that he has betrayed his roots by overriding state authority on patients rights, taxes, education, energy, the environment, and the faith-based initiative. Bush, a former Texas governor, called in his campaign and early in his administration for a more even balance of power between Washington, D.C. and the states, but state officials say he has not practiced what he preached. more

    • Stateline Story
    September 6, 2001
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    The title "union leader" evokes an image of a big, beefy man building cars in Detroit or driving a truck across the country. Eileen Cody, a member of the Washington state House of Representatives, doesn't fit that stereotype. A tall, scholarly-looking woman with short brown hair, Cody, a Democrat, is co-founder of a health care union in Seattle, where she works as a registered nurse. more

    • Stateline Story
    August 15, 2001
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    State lawmakers are spending tobacco settlement dollars wisely and health programs are raking in a hearty amount of the money, says a new analysis from the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). Legislatures have dedicated a full 46 percent of tobacco money for programs that aim to stop people from smoking and to shore up Medicaid, prescription drug programs for older Americans, children's health insurance plans and biomedical research. But if you look a little closer at the numbers, the percent of money being spent to stop smoking is measly and has dropped significantly from last year, anti-tobacco advocates say. more

    • Stateline Story
    July 17, 2001
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    Did you know Arizona, New Mexico and Texas have the largest percentages of people without health insurance or that Connecticut, New Hampshire and New York spend the most Medicaid money per person of all the states? If you didn't know those bits of trivia, the Kaiser Family Foundation can help you track that information and more. Check out the group's new website known as State Health Facts Online. more

    • Stateline Story
    June 27, 2001
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    State budgets are tight this year, but most health programs have escaped cutbacks. Arizona has agreed to hefty increases for the mentally ill, Oregon is considering a new voluntary screening program for newborns and Maine just okayed a small cigarette tax increase to expand health insurance for adults without kids. more

    • Stateline Story
    June 21, 2001
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    States are making little progress this year on anti-smoking prevention programs, say researchers from the American Lung Association. Though there are a few bright spots in Maine and Mississippi, in other parts of the country, lawmakers have backed measures that cap civil suits against the tobacco industry. Numerous states are also opting to use tobacco settlement money to help fill in budget deficits during tight economic times. more

    • Stateline Story
    June 11, 2001
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    On the surface, a nationwide tetanus and diphtheria vaccine shortage may not seem like such a big deal. How many people will step on a rusty nail this year? Doctors in states such as Wisconsin say the shortage is serious due to flooding in the state and related accidents, but in Kentucky, Oregon, Tennessee and Washington, health experts say it's not yet a problem. But the shortfall is resulting in higher prices for states and potential problems for patients. more

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