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    • Stateline Story
    May 20, 1999
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    Not surprisingly, volumes of Y2K information are floating in cyberspace, ranging from millennium sky-is-falling and head-in-the-sand ruminations from private citizens to Y2K web sites maintained by some of the public sector's top computer experts. In the final installment of our four-part Y2K series, stateline.org looks at some of the most helpful sites. For more information, click on more

    • Stateline Story
    May 19, 1999
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    For states coming to grips with Y2K preparations, the task calls for more than tweaking computer systems to keep them running beyond December 31. Technical advice is being extended to businesses and local governments seeking millennium bug protection. State-regulated services are under scrutiny to make sure they get ready for 2000. And state lawmakers have been furiously churning out legislation designed to shield states and businesses from Y2K-inspired lawsuits. For more information, click on more

    • Stateline Story
    May 18, 1999
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    To assure that their computer systems are Y2K-ready as of next New Year's Day, 43 states are spending more than $3.3 billion - a sum exceeding the combined gross national product of Guyana and Suriname in South America. Georgia is the leading Y2K spender, followed by California and New York. For more information, click on more

    • Stateline Story
    May 17, 1999
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    Only seven months remain before states confront the much-ballyhooed millennium bug, the Y2K computer glitch. Nebraska and North Dakota say they have already ensured their computers will function properly on Jan. 1, 2000; 19 other states claim to have completed three-quarters or more of the work. Sixteen more say they have finished at least half the programming needed to become Y2K compliant. But 13 states are less than halfway there or have failed to report their status, according to the National Association of State Information Resource Executives, which is monitoring the situation. Click on more

    • Stateline Story
    May 3, 1999
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    Web-surfing wine connoisseurs and e-pharmacy shoppers should check their state laws before they order a case of California Chardonnay or a vial of Viagra with the click of their computer mouse. Currently, liquor may be sold across state lines to residents in only 16 states without restrictions, such as limits on sales volumes. Twenty-one states prohibit direct-to-consumer sales of alcohol and six make it a felony. While no state has banned outright the importation of pharmaceuticals purchased online, some states require that online pharmacy sites be licensed by a state's pharmacy board to sell in that state. But the nature of online sales makes these areas hard to regulate. more

    • Stateline Story
    March 19, 1999
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    In California, where the modern electronics industry was born six decades ago, state government has stumbled from one expensive computer purchasing disaster to the next. The Department of Motor Vehicles is the latest agency to fall into a quagmire of expense, delay and legislative criticism. Between 1988-94, the department spent more than $50 million on a new system for driver's license and registration information, only to see the effort fail. The new system simply did not work. In 1995, a new effort was launched, but the state's legislative analyst, Elizabeth Hill, reports that the department does not know when the systems will be installed or how much they will eventually cost. stateline.org examines the problem. more

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