Media Accused Of Marketing Violence To Kids

 

A new government report says motion picture, music and electronic games companies unscrupulously market products that promote violence to children under 17-years-of-age.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) found evidence in marketing and media plans that "expressly target children under 17" and they promote the products in outlets frequented by youngsters.

The commission did not recommend legislative action by Congress, but it did request that the industry beef up self-regulatory efforts.

Findings:

  • Eighty percent of R-rated movies (rated for violence) focused marketing on youths under 17.
  • More than a quarter of the music labels with explicit content labels studied were found to target children under 17.
  • Violent video games rated for "Mature" audiences planned, 70 percent of the time, to sell to those under 17.

The FTC also chastised retailers for failing to vigilantly restrict juvenile access to these products.

Click on FTC report to read the study.

Click on FTC report to read the study.

 
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