Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis

Pew’s Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis presents 50-state data on key fiscal, economic, and demographic indicators and analyzes their impact on states’ long-term fiscal health. Drill down into state finances in five core areas.

Overview

 States Slow to Regain Fiscal Ground Lost in the Great Recession. View the indicator or read the analysis.

Revenue

  • Tax Revenue: State Tax Revenue Hits New Peak. View the indicator or read the analysis.
  • Federal Share of State Revenue: Federal Funds Provide $1 of Every $3 in State Revenue. View the indicator or read the analysis.

Spending

  • Change in State Spending: Federal Funds Drive Long-term Growth in State Spending. View the indicator or read the analysis.

Economy & People

  • Employment to Population Ratio: Employment Rate Lags in Most States. View the indicator or read the analysis.

Long-Term Costs

  • Debt and Unfunded Retirement Costs: Long-term Obligations Vary Across States. View the indicator or read the analysis.

Fiscal Policy

  • Reserves and Balances: States Slowly Replenish Reserve Funds. View the indicator or read the analysis

featured

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February 21, 2014
 

States Slow to Regain Fiscal Ground Lost in the Great Recession

More than four years after the Great Recession officially ended, states’ financial conditions are improving. But an examination of 50-state data by Pew's Fiscal 50: State Trends and Analysis shows most have yet to get back to where they were on some key measures of fiscal health. More
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February 21, 2014
 

State Tax Revenue Hits New Peak

Total state tax revenue finally appears to have recovered from its plunge in the Great Recession, after adjusting for inflation. In the second quarter of 2013, receipts for the 50 states combined narrowly surpassed their collective peak in 2008. But recovery was uneven. Only 20 states were above peak. More
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February 21, 2014
 

States Slowly Replenish Reserve Funds

Half of the states expected to have enough financial cushion to cover nearly 30 days of operating expenses at the end of fiscal 2013. That compares with a median of 41 days of operating expenses in reserve in fiscal 2007, just before the Great Recession. More
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November 27, 2013
 

Federal Funds Provide $1 of Every $3 in State Revenue

The share of states’ revenue coming from the federal government surged in the wake of the Great Recession to its highest level in at least 50 years. More
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November 27, 2013
 

Federal Funds Drive Long-term Growth in State Spending

Boosted by federal funds, total state spending after the end of the Great Recession hit its highest level as a share of the economy in at least 20 years. Meanwhile, spending from state governments’ own dollars shrank relative to the economy.  More
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November 27, 2013
 

Employment Rate Lags in Most States

Employment rates for people in their prime working years—ages 25 to 54—were measurably lower in 35 states in the 12 months ending June 2013 than in 2007, before the Great Recession. More
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November 27, 2013
 

Long-term Obligations Vary Across States

States commit to future spending when they borrow and when they fail to fully fund retirement costs for public employees. As of fiscal 2010, the largest of these long-term obligations was for unfunded pension liabilities in 31 states, unfunded retiree health care costs in 11 states, and public debt in eight states. More

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